HOME > SOCIAL ISSUES > ISSUES > MEDIA REGULATION
signup readlatest
 
Media Regulation
 
More Info

Current Status

Canada's radio and television industries are regulated by the CRTC, which reports to the federal government. Studies commissioned by the CRTC have found that there is a link between viewing violent programs and aggressive behaviour by children. The CRTC has worked with the television industry to set up voluntary codes of conduct to restrict violent programing. V-chip technology was introduced in 2001 to help parents screen out violent and inappropriate content from children.

In 2007 the EFC submitted a brief to the CRTC's Diversity of Voices hearings.

The broadcasting industry is largely self-regulating when it comes to content of programs. The Canadian Association of Broadcasters (CAB) has voluntary codes of conduct. Individuals may make complaints to the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council, which will hold a hearing and may publicly condemn the actions.

The CRTC established a new policy on religious broadcasting in 1993, which allowed for single-faith religious broadcasting with certain restrictions, such as the balance requirement. Only a few Christian television and radio stations have been licensed since that time. Most of the radio stations are low wattage and have a limited range.

The Internet is subject to Criminal Code provisions, but Canada does not have other forms of specific regulation of the Internet.

Issue: Media Regulation

Current Status
Statistics
What You Can Do
Resources

Printer-friendly version


Related Issue: Pornography


   
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Copyright ©2016 The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada. All rights reserved.